Flowers That Resemble Lavender: A Guide to Creating a Lavender-Inspired Garden

If you’re a fan of growing lavender in your garden, you know the joy it brings with its sweet fragrance and beautiful appearance that returns every year. But what if you want to complement your existing lavender plants with other flowers that resemble lavender? Or perhaps you’ve been unsuccessful in growing lavender and are searching for similar alternatives. Luckily, there are plenty of flowers that mimic lavender, each offering its own unique charm. In this guide, we’ll explore a selection of these lavender lookalikes and why they deserve a place in your garden. Not only are these plants easy to grow and maintain, but they are also perfect for beginners.

1. Purple Salvias (Salvia Nemorosa)

Salvia
Are you craving more color in your garden? Look no further than Purple Salvias. These long-stemmed plants can grow up to 16 inches tall and boast vibrant purple flowers that are sure to grab attention. With minimal maintenance requirements, they thrive when exposed to six hours of full sun and up to four hours of shade. Let’s delve into the care tips for these summer-blooming flowers:

  • Botanical Name: Salvia Nemorosa
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:

2. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

If insects are a nuisance in your garden, why not plant some Rosemary? Not only is it a natural deterrent for common pests like flies and mosquitoes, but it also serves as an aromatic ground cover. Rosemary adapts well to various soil conditions and can even be used as a cooking herb. Keep in mind that propagating Rosemary from seeds is not recommended due to low germination rates. Here’s what you need to know about caring for Rosemary:

  • Botanical Name: Rosmarinus officinalis
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:
Further reading:  The Best Plants With Green and White Leaves: Enhancing Your Home's Aesthetics

3. Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum)

Holy Basil
Holy Basil, a member of the Mint family, is often dried and steeped to create a delicious tea. However, when grown in your garden, it showcases tall purple flowers reminiscent of lavender spears. This low-maintenance shrub only requires ongoing pruning to keep it in check. To prevent rapid growth, start trimming it down during the first month after planting. Let’s explore the care guidelines for Holy Basil:

  • Botanical Name: Ocimum tenuiflorum
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:

4. Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia)

Russian Sage
Russian Sage truly captivates with its tall stems and bushy purple blooms, attracting not only eyes but also bees and other pollinators to your garden. Its fragrant, lavender-like scent makes it a top choice for those aiming to attract more bees. While Russian Sage can grow up to 5 feet tall and 4 feet wide, it regrows every spring as a perennial. Take note of the following care recommendations for these beautiful lavender-like flowers:

  • Botanical Name: Perovskia atriplicifolia
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:

5. Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

Similar to other plants on this list, Hyssop boasts tall purple blossoms that make a bold statement in your landscape. This perennial shrub works wonderfully as a border or when lined up against a fence. With its fresh, woody scent, Hyssop commonly attracts butterflies and other pollinators. As a low-maintenance plant, it’s perfect for those developing their gardening skills. Let’s take a look at caring for Hyssop at home:

  • Botanical Name: Hyssopus officinalis
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:
Further reading:  How to Nurture Your String of Pearls Plants

6. Catmint (Nepeta Mussinii)

Aside from its fun and eclectic name, Catmint serves multiple purposes in your garden, whether as a decorative element, ground cover, or border. When in bloom, the plant showcases small, eye-catching purple flowers suitable for homemade tea. With its adaptability to well-draining soil, Catmint is a low-maintenance favorite. Here’s what you need to know about caring for Catmint:

  • Botanical Name: Nepeta Mussinii
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:

7. Showy Hebe (Veronica speciosa)

The Showy Hebe stands out due to its textured flowers resembling pine cones. With a tropical appearance, it adds a touch of exoticism to any garden. Ensure the Showy Hebe receives full sun and moist soil to thrive, as it cannot tolerate full or partial shade. Discover how to care for the Showy Hebe:

  • Botanical Name: Veronica speciosa
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:

8. Anise Hyssop Blue Fortune (Agastache)

Also known as Blue Fortune, these blue-purple flowers resemble tall, sticky cones that attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Like other plants mentioned earlier, Anise Hyssop Blue Fortune requires minimal maintenance, only needing compost during initial planting. Once its root system is established, it exhibits drought tolerance, requiring less watering. Dive into the care details for Anise Hyssop Blue Fortune:

  • Botanical Name: Agastache
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:

9. Purple Rain – Ornamental Onion (Allium × cristophii)

Ornamental Onion
The Purple Rain – Ornamental Onion is a notable addition to any garden due to its large circular shape. While it resembles an onion, its name comes from the scent it emits, reminiscent of an onion. These striking flowers can grow up to 36 inches tall and, when pruned regularly, will reappear the following year. For impactful visual impact, consider planting at least 15 of them. Here’s what you need to know about the Purple Rain – Ornamental Onion:

  • Botanical Name: Allium × cristophii
  • Growth Rate:
  • Native Range:
  • Hardiness Zones:
  • Soil Needs:
  • Exposure
  • Blooming Period:
Further reading:  Planting Winter Rye for Optimal Deer Grazing

Final Thoughts

Not only do the plants mentioned in this guide resemble lavender, but they also create visually stunning gardens that attract pollinators, helping everything else in your garden bloom. By following this care guide, you can create a lavender-colored paradise that is easy to maintain and will bloom year after year, providing endless enjoyment. So, why not explore these lavender lookalikes and add a touch of beauty to your garden? For more gardening inspiration and resources, visit Ames Farm Center.