10 Unique Plants That Resemble Lavender + Quick Care Tips

Are you searching for plants that look like lavender but offer a fresh twist? Lavender is undoubtedly stunning, but its strong fragrance may not be everyone’s cup of tea. If you’re looking to switch things up in your yard, we’ve got you covered with a list of ten extraordinary plants that mimic the beauty of lavender without the overpowering scent. So, let’s dive in and explore the world of lavender look-alikes!

Basil

blooming basil

While basil leaves may not immediately evoke images of lavender, when this aromatic herb blooms, its flower stalks boast beautiful purple flowers. Among the various basil varieties, the tulsi plant, also known as holy basil, resembles lavender the closest. When it comes to care, ensure that basil plants receive full sun, fertile well-draining soil, and ample moisture. Watch out for wilting, which could be caused by either under or overwatering, or fungal diseases.

Catnip

Catnip blooming

Catnip is another plant that bears striking similarities to lavender. Although its silver-green, heart-shaped foliage may differ from lavender, its long flower stalks produce purple-blue or white blossoms. Catnip not only adds a pop of color but also attracts beneficial earthworms while repelling flea beetles and aphids. It thrives in full sun or partial shade and prefers well-draining soil. Adjusting the growing conditions will significantly impact its growth and flower production.

Hummingbird Mint

Hummingbird Mint

Hummingbird mint, belonging to the Agastache genus, features vibrant blossoms in different hues, with crimson and purple being popular choices. These plants bear the closest resemblance to lavender, with thicker flower heads that attract pollinators aplenty. The plant’s pale or gray-green leaves carry a mint-like fragrance and can repel deer and rabbits. Grow hummingbird mint in full sun, well-draining soil, and water it regularly during drought spells.

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Hyssop

Hyssop

Hyssop may not immediately strike you as resembling lavender, but its deep violet or purple-blue leaves match the lavender aesthetic. The herb’s flower spike contains multiple flowers, albeit bushier and sometimes more sparsely positioned than lavender, depending on the variety. Hyssop attracts a range of pollinators with its nectar-rich flowers and repels cabbage moths with its highly fragrant foliage. Give hyssop full sun exposure, regular watering until established, and a well-draining substrate.

Meadow Sage

Meadow Sage

The oblong foliage of meadow sage may not initially scream “lavender,” but once the plant produces its flower spikes, the resemblance becomes apparent. The vibrant violet, purple-blue, white, or pink blossoms, particularly in Blue Hill meadow sage, match the lavender aesthetic. To cultivate healthy meadow sage, tailor your watering schedule to the soil type, ensuring quick drainage. Full sun exposure is ideal for this herb to thrive.

Mexican Bush Sage

Mexican Bush Sage

Mexican bush sage, with its square stems and narrow silver-green foliage, offers a strong resemblance to lavender. Tall flower stalks adorned with long purple heads complete the picture. This sage variety blooms in late summer and entices numerous pollinators to your garden. Provide Mexican bush sage with full sun exposure, low watering needs once established, and a well-draining growing medium. Consider growing it alongside other sage plants for added benefits.

Purple Salvias

Purple Salvias

Salvias, with their tall flower stalks and narrow, pointed foliage, generally resemble lavender. Though the fragrance of salvias is not as potent as lavender, their vibrant purple flowers make them an excellent substitute. Sage plants emit a strong scent, deterring various pests, while attracting pollinators. These drought-tolerant plants require at least 6-8 hours of sunlight daily, regular watering before establishment, and a well-draining substrate for optimal growth.

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Rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary is the go-to herb if you seek a plant that closely mirrors lavender. Its narrow, spear-shaped foliage bears striking resemblance to lavender, albeit usually darker in color. While the rosemary plant doesn’t produce flower spikes like lavender, pale-blue blossoms are scattered among the foliage, giving it a unique appearance. Ensure your rosemary receives full sun, fertile well-draining soil, and regular but moderate watering.

Russian Sage

Russian Sage

Although Russian sage is not true sage, it shares an uncanny resemblance to lavender. These bushy plants are frequently mistaken for lavender due to their gray-green foliage and blue flowers. However, Russian sage boasts its own unique qualities, such as less fragrance compared to lavender. To cultivate Russian sage, provide full sun exposure, water it no more than twice a week once established, and plant it in a well-draining, moderately fertile substrate.

Wisteria

Wisteria

Wisteria may not immediately remind you of lavender, but this woody vine produces large clusters of pale purple and violet flowers resembling lavender blooms. Wisteria, like lavender, attracts pollinators, but its growth pattern is what makes it truly captivating. You can train wisteria to climb walls or even transform it into a unique tree shape. Give it full sun exposure, a moderately fertile and moist growing medium, and water it during dry spells once established.

Final Thoughts

The world of plants that resemble lavender goes beyond the traditional lavender plant. Basil, catnip, purple sage, hyssop, hummingbird mint, meadow sage, Mexican bush sage, purple salvias, rosemary, and wisteria all offer their unique charm as lavender look-alikes. Whether you desire a trailing habit, a plant that mimics a tree, or a splash of purple color, these lavend

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